Where do the characteristics of chemical compounds in the universe come from?

The Answer

Dear Brother / Sister,

Character and Individuality

LET US THINK NOW!
If, when tightly wrapped, 6 grains of rice become a bean instead of a 6-grain rise stack, 26 grains become a corn, and 79 grains become a hazelnut, there is something curious going on.

Atoms, which are the basic building blocks of elements, are made up of electrons, protons, and neutrons, and there are over 100 elements in nature, some naturally existing in the universe and some artificially made in laboratories by fusion. The basic difference between these elements is the number of protons in their nucleus. For example, a hydrogen atom contains 1 proton, carbon 6, iron 26, and gold 79 protons. However, all protons are the same – just like the grains of rice.

Let us think now:If, when tightly wrapped, 6 grains of rice become a bean instead of a 6-grain rise stack, 26 grains become a corn, and 79 grains become a hazelnut, there is something curious going on. Or, if 6 white men become a single giant black man when tightly wrapped, and he then turns back to 6 white men when the rope is removed… Even more peculiar, if 2 engineers turn into a medical doctor when tightly wrapped, and 3 engineers turn into a lawyer. We will probably give up.

The characteristics of carbon, iron, and gold are very different from one another, and it is clear that these characteristics do not originate from the protons themselves. This is because the protons possess neither the characteristic of carbon, nor iron nor gold. It also appears that it is quite possible to convert carbon or iron into gold – all we need to do is to split the carbon or iron atoms as we split uranium atoms in nuclear power plants, and recombine the released protons into groups of 79.

Similarly, if we mix two hydrogen atoms with one oxygen, this becomes a gas mixture with the properties of both hydrogen and oxygen. However, when the hydrogen and oxygen atoms combine with a chemical bond, “water” with completely different properties will occur. Considering that the force that provides the chemical bond does not possess the properties of water or any other compound, where do the characteristics of compounds come from? It seems that there is a common layer of individuality in the universe. The name “Fard” (the Individual One) shines on all beings like the sun.

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