Did the miracle of the Prophet Moses happen in the Nile or the Red Sea?

The Details of the Question

- Do we have any sound information in hadiths about which sea is the sea that splits into two in the story of Moses? (There are those who say it is the Nile or the Red Sea.)

The Answer

Dear Brother / Sister,

As it is mentioned in the verses of the Quran, one night, the Prophet Moses (Musa) was ordered to set off, and Pharaoh and his men followed them. Moses hit the sea with his staff and the sea split. Sons of Israel crossed the sea, but Pharaoh and his soldiers were drowned. (see al-Baqara 2/50; al-Araf 7/136)

Pharaoh believed when he was about to drown, but his belief was not accepted. (see Yunus 10/90)

Pharaoh’s body was preserved as a sign for those to come later. (see Yunus 10/92)

The name of the sea in which Pharaoh was drowned is not mentioned in the verses; we could not find any information about which sea it was in sound hadiths.

In our research, we came across with the names of different bodies of water such as the Red Sea, Qulzam, the Nile River, and the Mediterranean. However, we can say that, according to the vast majority of researchers, it is the Red Sea.

We also established a contact with Egypt, and the people there are of the opinion that it is the Red Sea.

In Egypt, the corpses of Pharaohs used to be preserved through mummification. It is understood from the verse above that the body of this Pharaoh, who was drowned, was miraculously preserved without being mummified. As a matter of fact, a corpse that did not decay though it had not been mummified was found in the place called “Jabalayn” on the shore of the Red Sea. It was determined that this corpse, which is preserved in the “British Museum” was at least 2500 years old. (Celal Ediz, “Üç Bin Yıllık Mucize”, Gerçeğe Doğru 2, İstanbul 1984, p. 1-4).

Jabalayn is a place by the Red Sea.

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